Orch. Works Volume 3/ Zador

December 24, 2015

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This Naxos recording #8.573274 is volume 3 in the series of orchestral works of composer Eugene Zador (1894-1977) which include his “Festival Overture,”” Dance Symphony,” and “Variations on a Hungarian Folk Song” written between 1919 and 1963 written in Hungary, Vienna, and the United States. Zador was a truly unsung composer as he did the majority of his work for the film composer Miklos Rozsa with little credit being bestowed upon him.

The CD begins with his “Festival Overture” (1963) which was performed during the inaugural opening week of the Los Angeles Music Center in December of 1964. Whether this work was specifically written for this occasion was unknown other than Zubin Mehta had selected it. The work begins with a brass fanfare which is also the main theme for the work as it returns throughout the 10 minute work. If you’re a fan of the film music of Rozsa you’ll hear references to some of his films such as Ben Hur and The Lost Weekend. While it does have some periods of darkness it lives up to its title as a very bright and upbeat work. For me it will be added to my festival compilation CD which many composers have written.

“Variations on a Hungarian Folk Song” (1919) is given its world premiere of the complete version of all eleven variations. Zador chose to offer each one in a different style including fugato, serenade, scherzo, and eight others. This was written in 1919 while Zador was still in Hungary but first performed in Vienna when he was living there in 1927. It is a work that is easily digestible and will perk up your spirits. My favorite variation is also the longest, the serenade featuring a gypsy style violin solo before it settles into music of peace and tranquility. One is reminded of a spring morning by a lake with a gentle breeze. It is also a happy uplifting work.

“Dance Symphony” (1936) is given it’s world premiere recording by the Budapest Symphony Orchestra conducted by Mariusz Smolij. This was written by Zador after he had lived in Vienna for many years and while there was much turmoil afoot he wrote of much happier times in Austria. The first movement, an allegro could easily have been mistaken for something that Strauss could have written. The second movement is an andante cantabile with the opening theme performed softly by the clarinet. The strings take over and offer their romantic lushness. Again one can hear the strains of something that could be cinematic. The third movement is a scherzo without the benefit of a trio. Filled with counterpoint from both the horns and the strings we’re listening to three different things going on at the same time. The fourth and final movement opens with strings and a clarinet solo which reminds you of the second movement before the brass introduce the rondo theme. It concludes with a theme in the style of Korngold.

As I stated earlier this is a very welcome addition to the series and I look forward to more releases from Naxos in the future.

 

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